Academic Forum

Expand your horizons, take time to reflect

Meet the World: Corruption in Sports - Everybody Wanna Ball

Corruption in big sports events like the FIFA World Cup Football or the Olympic Games has filled the headlines in the recent years. Has corruption already become an integral part to those big sports events? Or have sports events always been corrupt? Is it ethically defensible to give or accept bribes in this context? What about a moral hazard in regard to the expenditure of billions?

Program Information
Date April 19, 2016
Time 13:00 hrs
Location Black Box, Esplanade Building, free lunch included
Entry free. See also Facebook.
Guests Gerke Berenschot, Transparancy International and Alfred Archer, TSH Tilburg University
Contact Person Has Klerx
Language English
In cooperation with Extra Muros

Corruption in Sports: Everybody Wanna Ball

Corruption in big sports events has filled the headlines in the recent years. FIFA President Sepp Blatter and UEFA President Michel Platini were banned from all football-related activities for at least 8 years on these grounds, the former Brazil football federation chief Ricardo Teixeira accused of accepting about 200 million in bribes, and many other football powerbrokers in North America, Latin America and the Caribbean are under investigation. It is, however, not only the World Cup that sparked headlines; turning to the Olympics, the last event, 2014 in Sochi, Russia, has been termed the most corrupted Olympics in history. The next Olympic games will take place in Qatar – and here, too, it is said that bribes helped the state to win the bids.

Unethical, or ethically defensible?

Has corruption already become an integral part to those big sports events? Or have sports events always been corrupt? And what are reasons for this – does the transnational character of e.g. the Olympic games or the World Cup facilitate illegal business due to a monitoring problem. Furthermore, is it actually ethically defensible to give or accept bribes in this context? In several countries, in the end of the day, bribes are all-day business and not necessarily unethical. Is there maybe even a good side to it? Who is affected most by the corruption – is it the sports organizations or the tax-payers?

Sports and Human Rights

Another issue with big sports events is the moral hazard that comes with frequent Human Rights abuses, for example underpaid or even unpaid workers that have to build the sports palaces within little time or, in the example of Brasil, the destruction of Favelas to make space for the facilities. Do we (the West), and in particular the organizations themselves, bear responsibility for those issues or leave it to the countries where the events take place? Should we try harder to enforce the due regard for Human Rights? Also, is there a moral hazard in regard to the expenditure of billions for stadiums, hotels and infrastructure while a majority of the population in many host countries is poor, or does it ultimately result in an economic boost?

Meet the World is organized by Extra Muros, the University College student association, in cooperation with Academic Forum.







When: 19 April 2016 13:00

End date: 19 April 2016 13:45