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Tilburg Law and Economics Center

TILEC supports and stimulates academic research on the governance of economic activity. It fosters academically path breaking and practically relevant research and aims to be a leading center worldwide.

TILEC Seminar: Tim Simcoe (Boston U)

Disclosure Rules and Declared Essential Patents
10:45-11:45, M 1003

Timothy Simcoe, Boston University

Professor Simcoe’s research and teaching covers topics in industrial organization, particularly in the areas of industry standards, innovation, intellectual property, technology and corporate strategy. He has previously worked at the University of Toronto and Ernst & Young LLP, and he has served as a Senior Economist on the President’s Council of Economic Advisers.

Professor Simcoe received his A.B. in Applied Math and Economics from Harvard University, and an M.A. in Economics and Ph.D. in Business Administration from the University of California at Berkeley. He is a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research.

RESEARCH SPECIALTIES                                                 

  • Industry Standards
  • Intellectual Property
  • Industrial Organization
  • Applied Econometrics

Disclosure Rules and Declared Essential Patents

Many standard setting organizations (SSOs) require participants to disclose patents that might be infringed by implementing a proposed standard, and commit to license their “essential” patents on terms that are at least fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory (FRAND). Data from these SSO intellectual property disclosures have been used in academic studies to provide a window into the standard setting process, and in legal proceedings to assess parties’ relative contributions to a  standard. We develop a simple model of the disclosure process to illustrate the link between SSO rules and patent-holder incentives, and examine some of the model’s predictions using a novel dataset constructed from the disclosure archives of thirteen major SSOs. The central message of  the paper is that subtle differences in the rules used by different SSOs can influence which  patents are disclosed, the terms of licensing commitments, and ultimately long-run citation and litigation rates for the underlying patents.


When: 18 April 2018 10:45

End date: 18 April 2018 11:45

Where: Montesquieu building