Studying and Student life

European Credit Transfer System (ECTS)

The ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) is developed by the European Commission in order to provide common procedures to guarantee academic recognition of studies abroad.

Workload

The European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System is a student-centred system based on the student workload required to achieve the objectives of a program, objectives preferably specified in terms of the learning outcomes and competences to be acquired.

The ECTS system is based on three core elements:

  • Information (on study programs and students achievement)
  • Mutual agreement (between the partner institutions and the student)
  • The Use of ECTS credits (to indicate student workload)

Allocation of credits

Credits are allocated to all educational components of a study program (such as modules, courses, placements, dissertation work, etc.) and reflect the quantity of work each component requires to achieve its specific objectives or learning outcomes in relation to the total quantity of work necessary to complete a full year of study successfully. Full academic recognition is a condito sine qua non for student mobility in the framework of the ERASMUS+ program. Full academic recognition means that the study period abroad (including examinations or other forms of assessment), through the content of the agreed study program may differ.

Learning agreement

'The Learning Agreement' covers the program of study to be taken and the ECTS credits to be awarded for their satisfactory completion, committing both home and institution, as well as the student.

Transcript of records

'The transcript of Records' shows students' learning achievements in a way which is comprehensive, commonly understood and easily transferable from one institution to another.

Proof of recognition

'The Proof of recognition' shows students that the study period has been recognised in the home institution.

Tilburg University uses ECTS as described above in all its programs and courses since 2002.