Tilburg Law School

Tilburg Law School offers highly-ranked national and international education and research in law and public administration.

Research Department European and International Public Law

European Law

The EU law team shares an interest in the EU’s institutional and judicial protection regimes which they develop in their respective fields of specialization. Their holistic approach to EU law helps them to analyze and rethink the EU’s institutional and judicial protection regimes in the light of the challenges facing the EU in the 21st century.

The European Law team consists of 3 members


We provide core expertise in the following areas of EU law:

  • Citizenship
  • Environmental law
  • Migration and asylum law
  • Law and (bio)technology

International Public Law

We apply different approaches and methods to examine the evolution of the international legal order. Our focus is on how intensifying globalization now impacts the international rule of law, human rights, and international development.

The international Public Law Team consists of 5 members

Our expertise extends across:

  • Global Law
  • International Development
  • International Human Rights Law
  • International Legal History
  • International Public Law
  • International Relations

Environmental Law

The Environmental Law Team in Tilburg University’s department of European and International Law is unique because of its sheer size, specializations, international members and activities.

The international Public Law Team consists of 14 members (7 Professors and 7 PhD Researchers)

Our Team is composed of researchers from all over the world: Belgium, China, Germany, Iran, the Netherlands, South Africa and the United States. 

Our expertise extends across:

  • Climate Change Law
  • New Technologies
  • Wildlife Law

We meet frequently to discuss current issues in environmental law and these discussions feed into our environmental law blog.

Legal Philosophy

Our research critically rethinks and integrates key conceptual, normative and institutional issues called forth by transnational processes of unification and pluralization in the relationship between law, politics, and society. In turn, these processes are closely linked to the emergence and contestation of a 'we' as a plural subject. Collective self-legislation thus becomes the focal point of contemporary debates about legal unity and political plurality and about democracy and the rule of law in a global context.

The Legal Philosophy Team consists of 14 members (3 Professors and 10 PhD Researchers)

For fuller information on the Legal Philosophy Team and the webpage

We provide core expertise in the following areas:

  • Emergent transnational and global legal orders
  • Transnational human rights jurisprudence
  • Economic globalization and international human rights protection
  • Practical reason beyond cosmopolitanism and communitarianism
  • Immigration and distributive justice
  • Constitutionalism and constituent power
  • Tolerance and rights

Center for Transboundary Legal Development (CTLD)

EIP’s research is brought together by the CTLD, established on January 1, 2000. The current research program (2013-2016), entitled Charting the Global Legal Pathways builds on its predecessors: Permeability of Legal Systems (2000-2004) and Beyond State-centric Law and Legal Doctrine: New Actors and Determinants (2005-2012). The emergence of new normative orders, new forms of actors, and new types of interactions are explored with a view to developing a new normative language. The aim is to understand this change to the so-called Westphalian order of states, which historically has characterized the modern international legal order.

Research is premised on assertions that

  • Scholarship can no longer be confined to a single legal order, whether state-based or not, to a single actor or to a single normative perspective;
  • The legal and regulatory challenges of the complex landscape around us requires an interdisciplinary rather than an single disciplinary approach;
  • The way to address this complex global legal landscape is by making use of a functional approach (e.g. the description of a concrete problem or of the stated interests of a given actor).

For fuller information about CTLD.



Statelessness

The Institute on Statelessness and Inclusion is an independent non-profit organization committed to promoting the human rights of stateless persons and fostering inclusion to ultimately end statelessness. It was founded in 2014 by Amal de Chickera, Laura van Waas and Zahra Albarazi and is the successor to Tilburg University’s Stateless Program that ran from 2011-2014. The Institute promotes inclusion and participation of the stateless and disenfranchised and believes in the value of research, education, partnership and advocacy as means to promote the inclusion of these groups. It aims to develop and share skills and expertise with partners in civil society, academia, the UN and governments, and to serve as a catalyst for change. The Institute on Statelessness and Inclusion is registered as a Foundation under Dutch Law, and has an affiliation with Tilburg University, the Netherlands. More information.

EDOLAD

Edolad, the European Joint is an innovative doctoral program in the field of Law and Development that started life as a three-year Erasmus Mundus Lifelong Learning Programme Project, funded by an European Union, Lifelong Learning Project grant. It was launched in January 2015 and is chaired by Prof. Dr. Morag Goodwin, making Tilburg the coordinating partner of a consortium of the University of Edinburgh, Oslo University, Tartu University (Estonia) Deusto University (Spain) and North-West University (South Africa). Edolad is a three-year program, that includes a four-month core curriculum and compulsory fieldwork. More information.

Globalization and Legal Theory

Globalization and legal theory is a collaborative Ph.D. program between the Universities of Antwerp, Glasgow and Tilburg, which critically engages with law and politics in their increasingly globalized environment. Key areas of interest include authority, constitutionalism, responsibility and justice in a globalizing world. More information

Ius Carnivoris

Ius Carnivoris is an academic research project addressing the international legal framework applicable to the conservation and management of large carnivores in Europe. It runs from 2014 to 2019 and is carried out by Arie Trouwborst, Floor Fleurke and Jennifer Dubrulle, based at Tilburg Law School’s Department of European and International Public Law. Ius Carnivoris is funded by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO), under the Innovational Research Incentives Scheme. For more information see the Ius Carnivoris page with detailed information

Towards a regulatory framework for climate smart agriculture

This project is focusing on identifying the main elements of a regulatory framework that enables, facilitates and stimulates the transition of conventional farm practices toward ‘climate friendly’ practices in the EU. For more information see the project page with detailed information



18th International Wildlife Law Conference 18-19-(20) April 2018

Wolf Wildlife conference eip

The 18th International Wildlife Law Conference will be held on 18 and 19 April 2018 in Tilburg, the Netherlands. The conference is being organized by Tilburg University’s Department of European and International Public Law in partnership with the Institute for Biodiversity Law and Policy of Stetson University College of Law. It brings together a variety of professionals involved in wildlife conservation, including lawyers, policymakers and scientists; and student participation is strongly encouraged.

This event welcomes not only law professionals/students with an interest in wildlife, but also wildlife professionals/students with an interest in law. The two keynote speakers reflect this broad, multidisciplinary remit: Michael Bowman (Associate Professor at the University of Nottingham’s School of Law) and David Macdonald (founder and Director of the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit at the University of Oxford).

The conference will include presentations on a range of legal and policy frameworks for achieving transboundary conservation, including, inter alia, the various global and regional wildlife treaties and the European Union’s Nature Directives. (See the preliminary program for details.)

Registration for the conference is now open, until 8 April 2018. To secure your participation in the conference, please complete and submit the registration form. The venue’s capacity is limited, so the sooner you register, the more likely it is that you will secure a place. Thanks to the generous support of Tilburg Law School, no fee will be charged for participation in the conference as such. However, as explained below, fees will be charged for participation in the additional events surrounding the conference.

A conference dinner will take place on the evening of 18 April, in Tilburg University’s nicely located Faculty Club, and will consist of a tasty and ‘low-wildlife-footprint’ walking dinner. The cost of participation in the conference dinner is 45 euros per person.

An optional post-conference field trip to National Park ‘De Biesbosch’ will be held on 20 April, in partnership with Staatsbosbeheer. A typical Dutch wetland, the Biesbosch is the scene of successful habitat restoration projects, and beaver, osprey and white-tailed eagle have recently returned as reproducing species. The area will be explored on foot as well as by boat, and the field trip also includes a visit to the state-of-the-art Biesbosch Museum Island. Participants will depart from Tilburg by bus at 09h00 and be back in Tilburg at approximately 16h00, or can alternatively get off the bus at Dordrecht train station at approximately 15h00 (which may be convenient for those traveling to Schiphol Airport or other destinations). The cost of participating is, again, 45 euros per person, which includes lunch.  Places on the field trip are limited (and subject to a lower maximum than the conference itself).

Registration

Use this Registration form

More information

Global Law Lab

The Global Law Lab is a forum in which faculty and students explore together topics of central importance to thinking about global law. Through workshops, a speaker series and digital tools, the aim is to bring together scholars from all over the globe to discuss global law in all its manifestations. The Lab also hosts Global Law Fellows, who come to Tilburg for a limited period to further their work on a global law theme. Key questions include the creation and ownership of legal knowledge in the global era; the relationship of global law to Big Data; the relationship between regional governance and global normative structures; and spatial-normative questions related to jurisdiction and legal validity in global ordering. Fuller information.

Human Rights Research School

This is an inter-university alliance of universities and research institutes that was founded in 1995, and aims at promoting inter-disciplinary and multidisciplinary scientific research in the field of human rights. By means of critical analysis and the submission of proposals, based on thorough scientific research, the Human Rights Research School wants to contribute towards a further implementation and strengthening of international, regional and national systems designed to protect of human rights. EIP staff-members have participated in the Research School’s activities since its founding.  One of its key activities is the Ph.D Training Program that is offered to every Ph.D. researcher who is a member of the Research School. Fuller information.

International legal Incubater (ILI)

ILI is an EIP-hosted seminar that is co-convened by several departments, which is held on a monthly basis up to 6 times each academic year. The term “international legal” signifies that the seminar series extends beyond simply doctrinal international law, and welcomes all research that intersects law with any aspect of international space, theory or policy-making. For example, researchers working in such areas, among others, as international legal history, international economic law, international environmental law and victimology are very encouraged to join. The term “incubator” defines the generative purpose of the seminar series, which is to provide a collegial setting and intensive feedback for colleagues as they develop a draft (pre-publication) piece of writing (e.g. article, chapter or book proposal).

Legal Philosophy seminar

ILI is an EIP-hosted seminar that is co-convened by several departments, which is held on a monthly basis up to 6 times each academic year. The term “international legal” signifies that the seminar series extends beyond simply doctrinal international law, and welcomes all research that intersects law with any aspect of international space, theory or policy-making. For example, researchers working in such areas, among others, as international legal history, international economic law, international environmental law and victimology are very encouraged to join. The term “incubator” defines the generative purpose of the seminar series, which is to provide a collegial setting and intensive feedback for colleagues as they develop a draft (pre-publication) piece of writing (e.g. article, chapter or book proposal).



Publications