Research Economics and Management

With our research we focus on the themes of labor markets, aging, sustainability, innovation, market governance, banking, financial markets, entrepreneurship, marketing, and consumer behavior.

Ron Berndsen

Ron Berndsen holds the endowed chair of Financial Market Infrastructures and Systemic Risk at Tilburg University. He is also employed at De Nederlandsche Bank as Head of the Market Infrastructures Policy Department.

"A professor occupying an endowed chair is uniquely capable of drawing on practical experience, and that provides clear added value to the entire educational experience."

Can you tell us what your research entails and what it means for society?

ron berndsen

I hold the endowed chair of Financial Market Infrastructures and Systemic Risk at Tilburg University. The focus is on payment infrastructure: monetary transactions via PIN payments, corporate and consumer lending, savings and investment, etc. The aim of my research is to improve the efficiency and security of this infrastructure. One way to do this involves developing indicators that can help predict banking crises.  My work also involves supervising PhD students who are researching crypto currencies and blockchain, or who are developing machine learning algorithms to be used in the analysis of the continuous and unstoppable flow of monetary transactions.

What is the added value of an endowed chair in educational terms?

A professor occupying an endowed chair is uniquely capable of drawing on practical experience, and that provides clear added value to the entire educational experience. I hear from students time and again how much they appreciate the real-world examples I am able to share. I use my experience at DNB to augment my lectures, forging links to current issues to make the theory come alive. Moreover, I’m able to arrange research internships at DNB, giving students access to a wealth of data that would otherwise remain out of reach. This chair has a distinct advantage for me too, by the way. My work at DNB is highly specialized. Engaging with students forces me to get back to basics from time to time, and it gives me a renewed appreciation of my chosen field.

What motivates you personally?

My interests have always been broad and varied. During my PhD research, for example, I concentrated both on economics and on artificial intelligence. That’s what makes my current focus on payment systems so great, since it involves both a technological and an economic facet. In addition, I am fascinated by the process of learning, of sharing knowledge. I really enjoy explaining complex issues in simple terms. I’m always satisfied when I see that people really start to understand – whether it’s my students, coworkers or even my own kids.

Who do you admire most?

That would have to be Lex Hoogduin, the current chairman of LCH.Clearnet and Professor of Monetary Economics, Complexity and Uncertainty at the University of Groningen. I reported to him when I started at DNB. I admire him because of his uncanny ability to link theory to practice. He focuses on economics and complexity, a combination deserving of greater emphasis in our field.


Also see: Ron Berndsen