TILT

Keynote 25th Anniversary TILT in September by Joanna Bryson

Date: Time: 16:00 Location: Blackbox, Esplanade building

The Tilburg Institute for Law, Technology, and Society (TILT) conducts teaching and research into the regulation of technologies and technology-related societal innovation. TILT is a prominent player on the national as well as the international level when it comes to research and education in this particular area. TILT is celebrating its 25th anniversary with a year full of keynotes, workshops and events. Every month will be devoted to a different theme, such as cybercrime, e-health, privacy and climate change.

Click here if you would like to find out about the theme of each month and the programming committee.

Keynote of the month

Each Month, an Internationally Renowned Professor Stays with Us and Gives a Keynote. Click here if you would like to find out more about the visiting professors in 2019.
The keynote of the month in September will be Joanna Bryson and John Danaher. Joanna Bryson will give the Keynote Lecture. Please find the bio and abstract below:

Bio

Joanna J. Bryson is a transdisciplinary researcher on the structure and dynamics of human- and animal-like intelligence. Her research covering topics from artificial intelligence, through autonomy and robot ethics, and on to human cooperation has appeared in venues ranging from a reddit to Science.  She holds degrees in Psychology from Chicago and Edinburgh, and Artificial Intelligence from Edinburgh and MIT. She has additional professional research experience from Princeton, Oxford, Harvard, and LEGO, and technical experience in Chicago's financial industry, and international management consultancy. Bryson is presently a Reader (associate professor) at the University of Bath.

Abstract

"The Role of Humans in an Age of Intelligent Machines"

Artificial intelligence (AI) and the information age are bringing us more knowledge about ourselves and each other than any society has ever known. Yet at the same time it brings machines seemingly more capable of every human endeavour than any human can be. What are the limits of AI? Of intelligence and humanity more broadly? What are our ethical obligations to machines? Do these alter our obligations to each other? What is the basis of our social obligations? In this talk I will argue that there are really only two problems humanity (or any other species) has to solve. These are sustainability and inequality, or put another way, security and power. Or put a third way, how big of a pie can we make, and how do we slice up that pie. Life is not a zero-sum game; we and many other species use the security of sociality to construct public goods where everyone benefits. But still, every individual needs enough pie to thrive, and this is the challenge of inequality. I will argue that understanding these processes is not only essential to surviving the challenges of the climate crisis, but also helps answer the fundamental questions of ethics and social obligation. I will also examine how AI is presently affecting both of these problems. I will close with concrete policy recommendations for managing AI and our society. 

Program

15.45-16.00 - Coffee/tea
16.00-16.05 - Opening/Introduction
16.05-17.00 - Keynote
17.00-17.30 - Q&A
17.30-18.30 – Drinks in Esplanade