Research Social and Behavioral Sciences

Research Social and Behavioral Sciences

News Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Women with mild heart blockage report poorer health, more anxiety and negativity than men 24 Feb 2017Direct link Women with mild heart blockage report poorer health, more anxiety and negativity than men
    Women with mild blockage of coronary arteries report poorer health, more anxiety and a more negative outlook than men with the same condition, according to new research by Paula Mommersteeg c.s. in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

  • Participation Act in the Knowledge Sector - 'Inclusive HRM' works! 20 Feb 2017News Participation Act in the Knowledge Sector - 'Inclusive HRM' works!
    SoFoKleS (Social Fund Knowledge Sector) posted an article in their online magazine concerning the study by Dr. Charissa Freese and her colleague Dr. Irmgard Borghouts on the consequences of the Participation Act. To find out in which way we can best realise jobs for people with disabilities, we have to account for several factors.

  • Pearl van Lonkhuizen and Suzanne Hendricksen win Vrienden van Cobbenhagen student awards 18 Jan 2017News Pearl van Lonkhuizen and Suzanne Hendricksen win Vrienden van Cobbenhagen student awards
    The jury of the Vrienden van Cobbenhagen (Friends of Cobbenhagen) alumni association has awarded a scholarship of EUR 10,000 to Pearl van Lonkhuizen, a Bachelor’s degree student at Tilburg School of Social and Behavioral Sciences, and a prize of EUR 5,000 to Suzanne Hendricksen, a Master’s degree student at Tilburg Law School.

  • Are you ready for the birth of your baby? Participate in the U & uw baby project! 18 Jan 2017News Are you ready for the birth of your baby? Participate in the U & uw baby project!
    U & uw baby (You and your baby) is a research project of Tilburg University and the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. With U & uw baby we study the effects of a new parenting course.

  • Crying at work could damage your career, study suggests 22 Dec 2016News Crying at work could damage your career, study suggests
    If you've ever cried at work, you may want to hold back the tears. Researchers say crying on the job may hurt your credibility, and even damage your career. The studies by Dutch researcher Niels van de Ven suggest crying at work changes the way a person is perceived by colleagues. "What we see is that someone who cries is seen as warmer, but also as less competent," says van de Ven on the Canadian radio station CBC.

Institutes

  • CIR

    Center for Innovation Research
    Theme: Innovatie, organisatie en management
  • Center of Research on Psychological and Somatic disorders
    Theme: Medical and clinical psychology
  • Tilburg Institute for Behavioral Economics Research
    Theme: Consumentengedrag
  • Wetenschappelijk centrum op het gebied van zorg en welzijn
    Theme: Transformatie in zorg en welzijn

Most viewed experts Social and Behavioral Sciences

Vingerhoets, A.J.J.M.
Name prof. dr. A.J.J.M. (Ad) Vingerhoets
TS Social and Behavioral Sciences
Medical and Clinical Psychology
Position Full Professor
Room T 522
Phone +31 13 466 2087
E-mail vingerhoets@tilburguniversity.edu
Rutten, R.P.J.H.
Name dr. R.P.J.H. (Roel) Rutten
TS Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department of Organization Studies
Position Assistant Professor
Room S 606
Phone +31 13 466 2164
E-mail r.p.j.h.rutten@tilburguniversity.edu
Wicherts, J.M.
Name dr. J.M. Wicherts
TS Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department of Methodology and Statistics
Position Universitair hoofddocent
Room S 717
Phone +31 13 466 3215
E-mail j.m.wicherts@tilburguniversity.edu
Vijver, A.J.R. van de
Name prof. dr. A.J.R. van de Vijver
TS Social and Behavioral Sciences
Dean Office
Position Professor & Researcher
Room D 258
Phone +31 13 466 2528
E-mail fons.vandevijver@tilburguniversity.edu

Publications about Social and Behavioral Sciences