Bio

Social comparisons are ubiquitous in how people think and feel about themselves and others. Consequently, comparisons with other people play an important role in motivating behavior in social life. In my research, I am particularly interested in how specific emotions based on social comparisons such as envy, pride, or admiration determine how people make sense of social hierarchies and navigate in them, creating conflict or cooperation in social relationships and organizations. I use experimental as well as correlational approaches to investigate how such emotions contribute to decision-making, social perception, and behavior at the individual and social level.  Recently, I have taken an interest in using Virtual Reality as a tool for psychological research. As an editor of the In-Mind Magazine, my goal is to enable psychologists to communicate their science to the public.

Teaching

I have taught courses on work and organizational psychology,  negotiation and conflict resolution, basic and applied social psychology, emotion and motivation, and consumer behavior at the University of Cologne and the University of Bremen.

Courses

Recent publications

  1. Counterfactual thoughts distinguish benign and malicious envy

    Crusius, J., & Lange, J. (Accepted/In press). Counterfactual thoughts distinguish benign and malicious envy. Emotion.
  2. Dispositional greed predicts benign and malicious envy

    Crusius, J., Thierhoff, J., & Lange, J. (2021). Dispositional greed predicts benign and malicious envy. Personality and Individual Differences, 168, [110361].
  3. A direct test of the similarity assumption - Focusing on differences …

    Genschow, O., Cracco, E., Verbeke, P., Westfal, M., & Crusius, J. (2021). A direct test of the similarity assumption: Focusing on differences as compared with similarities decreases automatic imitation. Cognition, 215, [104824].
  4. Does social psychology persist over half a century? - A direct replic…

    Genschow, O., Westfal, M., Crusius, J., Bartosch, L., Feikes, K. I., Pallasch, N., & Wozniak, M. (2021). Does social psychology persist over half a century? A direct replication of Cialdini et al.’s (1975) classic door-in-the-face technique. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 120(2), e1-e7.
  5. Group membership does not modulate automatic imitation

    Genschow, O., Westfal, M., Cracco, E., & Crusius, J. (2021). Group membership does not modulate automatic imitation. Psychological Research.

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