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Objections and Appeals Advisory Committee (CABB)

A student may file a notice of appeal with the Executive Board (EB) if they disagree with a decision made by or on behalf of EB. This can be seen as a request to reconsider a decision taken earlier. This mainly concerns decisions made in the context of enrollment, payment of tuition fees, financial support (e.g. administrative grants) etc. The EB requests advice from the Objections and Appeals Advisory Committee (CABB).

This option to object can only be used if no other legal process (e.g., at the Examination Appeals Board is open to the student.

How does the procedure work?

The objection

The EB must receive the notice of objection within six weeks of the decision against which you are objecting to. In preparation for the EB's decision, the objection will be dealt with by the CABB (the disputes advisory committee referred to in Article 7.63a of the HERA). The CABB will advise the EB on the final decision to be taken regarding the objection. As soon as the objection has been received by the EB, it will be forwarded to the CABB. You will then receive an acknowledgement of receipt of the objection from the CABB.

Amicable settlement

Before the objection is officially processed, the law prescribes a mandatory attempt at amicable settlement. The Chair of the CABB will forward the objection to the body that took the contested decision, asking it to examine whether an amicable settlement is possible. This body will contact you for this purpose. The aim is then to carefully examine whether the facts on which the decision was based are correct and whether the grounds are valid. You can then jointly discuss whether a solution can still be found.

The defense

If an amicable settlement has not been reached, the respondent will be invited to submit a written response to the objection. In this response, the decision against which the objection was lodged and the grounds on which that decision was made will be explained in greater detail and the respondent will respond to the grounds put forward by you.

The hearing

After the respondent has submitted its views, a hearing is scheduled. The CABB consists of three members: the Chair—who presides over the hearing—and two other members, who are lecturers or members of the academic staff. During the hearing, both parties will have the opportunity to explain their positions orally, and the members of the CABB will have the opportunity to ask questions. The CABB will ultimately base its advice on the earlier written documents and on what was said during the hearing.

After the hearing

After the hearing, the CABB will issue a written recommendation to the EB. As a rule, the EB will decide in accordance with the advice. However, the EB is also entitled to deviate from this. If the EB deviates from the advice, it must give reasons for its decision. The EB’s written decision will be sent to the appellant.

Appeal

An appeal may be lodged against a decision of the EB. In most cases, the Administrative Jurisdiction Division of the Council of State (ABRvS) is authorized to hear such an appeal. What can be appealed against depends on the subject of the dispute. The appeals body to which you can turn and its address will be stated in the decision.

Frequently asked questions about the procedure

How do I know if I can file an objection?

Usually, under the decision you received, it says that you can file an objection.

Within what time frame must I submit my notice of objection?

If you want to file an objection, it is important to do so in time. The notice of objection must reach the EB within six weeks of the day on which the decision was announced.

If you are enrolled at the university and have an administration number, you can send your objection through this website . If you are not enrolled at the university and, therefore, do not have an administration number, you can send your notice of objection by post. It is advisable to do this by registered mail so that you have proof of the date on which it was sent. If the objection is not submitted within these six weeks, it will be declared inadmissible by the Chair of the CABB. This means that no substantive ruling will be made. This is only different if you have a well-founded reason for exceeding the deadline. Vacations are in any case not a valid reason. 

How can I file an objection?

Please check the page How to file an objection with the Executive Board for all the details. 

I need more time to file my objection. Is that possible?

If you need more than six weeks to properly substantiate the arguments for your objection, for example, because you first want to obtain advice, a "pro forma" objection can be submitted. In a pro forma objection you announce that you wish to object and to which decision you are objecting, but you will not yet indicate the grounds for your objection. In this way, you can avoid exceeding the objection period. You can submit a pro forma objection both via the online system (if you have an administration number) and by letter.  The CABB will inform you of the deadline—generally within 14 days—by which the grounds for the objection must be sent.

I am of the opinion that there is urgency. Can my objection be handled quickly?

If there is an urgency, the Chair of the CABB may, upon request, determine that the CABB issue an opinion to the EB as soon as possible. In such a case, clearly state the reasons why urgency is required. Within one week of receiving the objection, the Chair will determine whether the matter is urgent and will notify the person concerned.

I have been asked to reach an amicable agreement. What is that?

Before the objection is officially processed, the law prescribes a mandatory attempt at amicable settlement. The Chair of the CABB will forward the objection to the body that took the contested decision, asking it to examine whether an amicable settlement is possible. This body will contact you for this purpose. The aim is then to carefully examine whether the facts on which the decision was based are correct and whether the grounds are valid. You can then discuss together whether a solution can still be found.

What is a statement of defense?

If an amicable settlement has not been reached, the respondent will be invited to submit a written response to the objection. In this response, the decision against which the objection was lodged and the grounds on which that decision was made will be explained in greater detail and the respondent will react to the grounds put forward by you.

What does... mean?
  • Appellant: the person submitting the objection or appeal
  • Respondent: the person who made the decision that is being challenged or appealed, e.g., the Examination Board or a Director of a Division or School.
  • Declared admissible: the objection or appeal meets all the requirements for consideration.
  • Provisional arrangement: pending the hearing of the objection or appeal, an arrangement (e.g., permission to participate in a resit) in order to prevent a late decision (e.g., because the resit in which you were not allowed to participate is already over by then).
  • Amicable settlement: prior to the hearing of the objection or appeal, both parties try to reach an agreement by mutual consultation. Trying to find a compromise is usually much quicker and often provides a more satisfactory solution than a time-consuming, formal procedure.

Frequently asked questions about the handling of the objection (the hearing)

When will my objection be handled?

2024:

  • 11 January
  • 25 January
  • 8 February
  • 22 February
  • 7 March
  • 21 March
  • 4 April
  • 18 April
  • 2 May
  • 16 May
  • 30 May
  • 13 June
  • 27 June
  • 11 July
  • 25 July
  • 8 August
  • 22 August
  • 5 September
  • 19 September
  • 3 October
  • 17 October
  • 31 October
  • 14 November
  • 28 November
  • 19 December
I am of the opinion that there is urgency. Can my objection be handled quickly?

If there is an urgency, the Chair of the CABB may, upon request, determine that the CABB issue an opinion to the EB as soon as possible. In such a case, clearly state the reasons why urgency is required. Within one week of receiving the objection, the Chair will determine whether the matter is urgent and will notify the person concerned.

What does a hearing look like?

After the respondent has submitted its views, a hearing is scheduled. The CABB consists of three members: the Chair—who presides over the hearing—and two other members, who are lecturers or members of the academic staff. During the hearing, both parties will have the opportunity to explain their positions orally, and the members of the CABB will have the opportunity to ask questions. The CABB will ultimately base its advice on the earlier written documents and on what was said during the hearing.

Frequently asked questions about the outcome of the proceedings

What happens after the hearing?

After the hearing, the CABB will issue a written recommendation to the EB. As a rule, the EB will decide in accordance with the advice. However, the EB is also entitled to deviate from this. If the EB deviates from the advice, it must give reasons for its decision. The EB’s written decision will be sent to the appellant.

I disagree with the decision of the Executive Board. What steps can in take?

An appeal may be lodged against a decision of the EB. In most cases, the Appeals Tribunal for Higher Education is authorized to hear such an appeal. What can be appealed against depends on the subject of the dispute. The appeals body to which you can turn and its address will be stated in the decision.