Bio

Prof. dr. Ilja van Beest obtained his PhD at Leiden University in 2001. He started his position as full professor of social psychology at Tilburg University in 2009. Van Beest primary research interests lie in the domain of group and interpersonal processes with a specific focus on coalition formation, conflict detection, ostracism, fairness, deception, trust, emotions and symptom attribution.  

He currently serves as editor-in-chief of the journal Social Influence.  In addition, he  is a board member of the Tilburg Institute for Behavioral Research (Tiber) and a member of the Kurt Lewin Institute. At the KLI institute he helps in the role of research director.  

 

 

Teaching

Van Beest has taught courses on social influence, leadership, and interpersonal behavior. He currently teaches introduction to social psychology in the bachelor of psychology and foundations of social psychology in the research master.  

Courses

Recent publications

  1. Go on without me - When underperforming group members prefer to leave…

    Doolaard, F. T., Noordewier, M. K., Lelieveld, G. J., van Beest, I., & van Dijk, E. (2021). Go on without me: When underperforming group members prefer to leave their group. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 95, [104158].
  2. The effect of thinking about being excluded by God on well-being - A …

    George, A. R., Wesselmann, E. D., Hilgard, J., Young, A. I., & van Beest, I. (2021). The effect of thinking about being excluded by God on well-being: A replication and extension. International Journal for The Psychology of Religion, 31(2), 138-148.
  3. Facial appearance and electoral success of male Italian politicians -…

    Jaeger, B., Evans, A., & van Beest, I. (2021). Facial appearance and electoral success of male Italian politicians: Are trustworthy-looking candidates more successful in corrupt regions? Social Psychology, 52(1), 1-12.
  4. Understanding the role of faces in person perception: Increased relia…

    Jaeger, B., Evans, A., Stel, M., & van Beest, I. (2021). Understanding the role of faces in person perception: Increased reliance on facial appearance when judging sociability. https://psyarxiv.com/c3rdh/
  5. Why and when suffering increases the perceived likelihood of fortuito…

    Ong, H. H., Nelissen, R., & van Beest, I. (2021). Why and when suffering increases the perceived likelihood of fortuitous rewards. British Journal of Social Psychology, 60(2), 548-569.

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